A Short Review of the 14th Denial: A Civil Rights Memoir by Cannie Lee Cody with Rickey E. Pittman. Review by Cara Brookins

“In a nation where right and wrong too often bleed into dangerous shades of gray, in The 14th Denial: A Civil Rights Memoir, authored by Cannie Lee Cody with Rickey Pittman, the writers provide undeniable evidence of corrupt police, FBI, and government misconduct following the murder of Johnny Mae Chappell, an African American mother of ten in Jacksonville, Florida. Cody’s account details his unrelenting search for justice through more than thirty years of bureaucrats’ blatant lies and disregard for justice. The 14th Denial cuts gray areas into a clear separation of black and white. I’m left both outraged by the travesty of the widespread corruption and empowered by the integrity of a few fine men.” –Cara Brookins

Cara Brookins is a freelance writer in Little Rock, Arkansas. She is a  member of the Fiction Writers of Central Arkansas, Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, and the Central Arkansas Creative Writers. She is the author of several books, including The Doris Free series, Those Who Walked Before, Gadget Geeks, Liberty, and Terra. She is in demand for presentations on writing and for writing workshops. Her website is http://www.carabrookins.com/

Cara Brookins, Writer in Little Rock

Cara Brookins

You can take a look at the 14th Denial at the publisher’s website here:

2 thoughts on “A Short Review of the 14th Denial: A Civil Rights Memoir by Cannie Lee Cody with Rickey E. Pittman. Review by Cara Brookins

  1. I am so happy to see this book has made an impact on someone such as Cara Brookins,who has given such a glowing review for the 14th Denial.
    I grew up hearing about this entire story from my cousin, Lee Cody. He paid a very dear, devastating price for persuing corruption on many levels for almost 50 years. He was stripped of his career and try as he might, lost every attempt to right the wrongs he witnessed over this many years. He was encouraged by many, supported by few, and with relentless determination for the truth continued every effort to get his story out to the public. The murder of Johnny Mae Chappell was the beginning of a lifetime of struggle for Lee to bring justice to this destroyed family and to his life as well. The price was paid by all except by the men who actually murdered this poor mother of ten. “The truth will set you free” comes to mind, as I know Lee, at 80 years old, has never given up the struggle to see that this story is told. Civil Rights scholars need to read and take note of Lee Cody, who is a patriot hidden in the shadows for far too long.

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